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Review of 2018 Med x Tech Summit Asia (MEDTEX)

2019-01-17

2018 Med x Tech Summit Asia,Su, Jia-chyuan, President, Legislative Yuan, Republic of China(Taiwan)In today's smart and digitized modern society, technological innovation has undoubtedly become the hottest term globally. Every advanced country in the world is looking to excel in this field and Taiwan is no exception, especially in the field of medical technology innovations. Taiwan owns one-of-a-kind medical insurance data and a large number of top medical professionals, making Taiwan the best place in the world to develop medical technology.Chi-Huey Wong, Distinguished Research Fellow, The Genomics Research Center, Academia Sinica
The goal of Med x Tech Summit Asia is bring Biotech industry and electronic IT industry sitting together to inspire the possibility of international collaboration. Taiwan’s diverse and innovative R&D efforts, along with the operational and R&D strengths of its companies, and the government’s commitment to guiding stable industrial development make this the right time to accelerate integration and cooperation with international markets.
Medical Health Trends to Watch in the Next Five Years. MEDTEX 2018 CEO Forum: Healthcare CEOs reiterate virtues of cross-industry collaboration.Science Editors: Rajaneesh K Gopinath & Joanne Shih.Staying true to its name, the 2018 Med x Tech Summit Asia (MEDTEX) held at Taipei served as the point of convergence for leaders belonging to both pharmaceutical and Information technology (IT) industries to exchange ideas and comprehend the potential of bilateral associations. Besides communicating the stellar achievements of their respective industries, the CEOs also provided valuable insights on key innovations that require a collaborative effort for effective implementation. With an ever growing need to cater to millions every day, the healthcare industry cannot afford to be unidimensional. Hence, it constantly strives to combine innovative technologies with R&D. Although IT has always impacted healthcare, companies still find it difficult to incorporate new knowledge with concurrently evolving technologies. This is because, in addition to being compatible, technology must also be safe and cost-effective. It is therefore imperative for both industries to forge a sustainable partnership. However, initiating such an endeavor has remained challenging. MEDTEX aimed to address this issue specifically by bringing both camps together. One of the major highlights of the event was the CEO perspectives, a forum in which panelists from both industries discussed the future of healthcare and various intersectional possibilities. The panel boasted of prominent names such as:
●Murakami Sei, GM of Industry & Distribution Business Unit, Hitachi
●Birgit Reitmaier, Head of Access to Innovation APAC, Merck
●Larry Merizalde, GM of Greater China and Vietnam, Teva
●Eunice Chiu, VP Sales, and GM Taiwan, NVIDIA 
●Harry Yang, VP&GM of Medical Devices Group. Qisda
The session was moderated by Simon Chang, Chairman of IBMI. He quizzed the panelists about their perspectives on current innovations, their predictions for the future and the opportunities and challenges of interdisciplinary collaborations.
When asked about their predictions on technological innovations that could influence the healthcare industry in the next five years, Murakami Sei and other panelists opined that the artificial intelligence (AI) technology is here to stay. Since there is a deluge of patient information, Sei feels that AI and the Internet of things (IoT) technologies would be applied for the management of complex, big data. Birgit Reitmaier listed the challenges prevalent in delivering precision medicine and said that her company aims to develop innovations that deliver better outcomes to patients. She said, both pharma companies and other healthcare units in the value chain must become more efficient in exploiting technology to design better clinical applications, new testing methods, and business models. Larry Merizalde, on the other hand, anticipated a major overhaul in the operation of pharmaceutical companies from development to manufacturing and commercialization. He echoed Reitmaier’s views while saying that at Teva, new technologies would be developed to facilitate an ecosystem where there is a connection between physicians, patients and treatment methods. Eunice Chiu, pointed out that an aging society and shortage of healthcare professionals will be the most urgent issues that need to be resolved in the near future. She too felt that AI, machine learning, and genomic sequencing would be much improved and will greatly transform therapeutics and preventive medicine. Harry Yang of Qisda, reflected his perspective as a tech expert saying that AI, robotics, and blockchain technologies would bring out significant changes in healthcare applications.
All speakers agreed that advancing healthcare systems with technologies is largely possible only when professionals from diverse fields join forces and participate in interdisciplinary communication. However, it’s easier said than done. Sei said, “Each field has its own language. You need to speak differently within IT professionals and clinicians.” Merizalde shared Teva’s experience in collaborating with IBM Watson to perform analytics and monitor asthma patients, “Each party has something to bring to the table in terms of solving a problem, but everyone has different approaches and paces”. The biggest challenge is when tech collaborators do not understand the slow regulatory pace with which a pharmaceutical company operates. Reitmaier added that Merck encountered conflicts while working with the diagnostic companies because of the highly regulated nature of both pharmaceutical and diagnostic industries. In order to narrow this communication gap, NVIDIA used the online platform to educate and integrate people working in different positions. Harry Yang of Qisda mentioned that the challenge of cooperating with hospitals depends on the physicians’ human resource management; Chiu from NVIDIA said that all the medical devices in the future will use artificial intelligence. Therefore, the hospitals are the good business opportunities for the ICT industry.
Technology possesses the power to transform any industry. In recent years, popular technologies such as AI, IoT, and blockchain have had a great impact on the medical industry. Ted Chang, CTO of Quanta Computer, moderated the discussion session where panelists mulled over the aforementioned theme. He is of the opinion that technology is just a platform. The challenge lies in exploiting that tool to make medical treatments more advanced and customized. To discuss it in detail, he invited the following representatives from the scientific and technological communities to brainstorm together: Keren Priyadarshini, Regional Business Leader at Microsoft, Vitaly Herasevich, MD, Associate Professor at the Division of Critical Care at Mayo Clinic, USA, and David Hansen, CEO of Australian e-Health Research Centre.
Alexandra Tinsman, Regional Head of NEM Foundation, noted that blockchain is a digital book and an economic record. About 90% of health care companies have begun using blockchain technology. It provides a more streamlined and secure method of maintaining transaction billing than traditional repositories. NEM's blockchain platform is a
Medical data doubles every 73 days, far more than humans could digest, so artificial intelligence (AI) is much needed. Dr. Liang-Yeu Lenny Chen, Manager & Asian Pacific Leader, IBM Watson Health, USA, said the AI developed by the company is dedicated to integrating all kinds of data, including literature, images, genetic sequencing etc., to comprehend the meaning behind it. The goal of this AI system is not to replace doctors but serve as their reliable clinical assistant.Since the successful decoding of the human genome and the reduction in the cost of gene sequencing, medical efficiency has greatly improved. However, genomics is as deep as the sea, and there is still valuable information to be explored. Dr. Alireza Haghighi, President of Advancement Initiative for Medicine and Science, Harvard Medical School, shared about the School's fundraising program that helped establish a platform to share patient genetic map data. Such data helps scientists find disease-causing genes more efficiently and benefit more patients.In the area of cancer treatment, Dr. Colin Collins, the director of Laboratory for Advanced Genome Analysis, Vancouver Prostate Centre, Canada, said humorously:

MEDTEX Subbit Venue:Taipei Nangaang Exhibition Center,Hall2,4F
2018 Med x Tech Summit Asia,Su, Jia-chyuan, President, Legislative Yuan, Republic of China(Taiwan)In today's smart and digitized modern society, technological innovation has undoubtedly become the hottest term globally. Every advanced country in the world is looking to excel in this field and Taiwan is no exception, especially in the field of medical technology innovations. Taiwan owns one-of-a-kind medical insurance data and a large number of top medical professionals, making Taiwan the best place in the world to develop medical technology.Chi-Huey Wong, Distinguished Research Fellow, The Genomics Research Center, Academia Sinica.The goal of Med x Tech Summit Asia is bring Biotech industry and electronic IT industry sitting together to inspire the possibility of international collaboration. Taiwan’s diverse and innovative R&D efforts, along with the operational and R&D strengths of its companies, and the government’s commitment to guiding stable industrial development make this the right time to accelerate integration and cooperation with international markets.
Science Editors: Rajaneesh K Gopinath & Joanne Shih Staying true to its name, the 2018 Med x Tech Summit Asia (MEDTEX) held at Taipei served as the point of convergence for leaders belonging to both pharmaceutical and Information technology (IT) industries to exchange ideas and comprehend the potential of bilateral associations. Besides communicating the stellar achievements of their respective industries, the CEOs also provided valuable insights on key innovations that require a collaborative effort for effective implementation. With an ever growing need to cater to millions every day, the healthcare industry cannot afford to be unidimensional. Hence, it constantly strives to combine innovative technologies with R&D. Although IT has always impacted healthcare, companies still find it difficult to incorporate new knowledge with concurrently evolving technologies. This is because, in addition to being compatible, technology must also be safe and cost-effective. It is therefore imperative for both industries to forge a sustainable partnership. However, initiating such an endeavor has remained challenging. MEDTEX aimed to address this issue specifically by bringing both camps together. One of the major highlights of the event was the CEO perspectives, a forum in which panelists from both industries discussed the future of healthcare and various intersectional possibilities. The panel boasted of prominent names such as:
●	Murakami Sei, GM of Industry & Distribution Business Unit, Hitachi
●	Birgit Reitmaier, Head of Access to Innovation APAC, Merck
●	Larry Merizalde, GM of Greater China and Vietnam, Teva
●	Eunice Chiu, VP Sales, and GM Taiwan, NVIDIA 
●	Harry Yang, VP&GM of Medical Devices Group. Qisda
The session was moderated by Simon Chang, Chairman of IBMI. He quizzed the panelists about their perspectives on current innovations, their predictions for the future and the opportunities and challenges of interdisciplinary collaborations.
When asked about their predictions on technological innovations that could influence the healthcare industry in the next five years, Murakami Sei and other panelists opined that the artificial intelligence (AI) technology is here to stay. Since there is a deluge of patient information, Sei feels that AI and the Internet of things (IoT) technologies would be applied for the management of complex, big data. Birgit Reitmaier listed the challenges prevalent in delivering precision medicine and said that her company aims to develop innovations that deliver better outcomes to patients. She said, both pharma companies and other healthcare units in the value chain must become more efficient in exploiting technology to design better clinical applications, new testing methods, and business models. Larry Merizalde, on the other hand, anticipated a major overhaul in the operation of pharmaceutical companies from development to manufacturing and commercialization. He echoed Reitmaier’s views while saying that at Teva, new technologies would be developed to facilitate an ecosystem where there is a connection between physicians, patients and treatment methods. Eunice Chiu, pointed out that an aging society and shortage of healthcare professionals will be the most urgent issues that need to be resolved in the near future. She too felt that AI, machine learning, and genomic sequencing would be much improved and will greatly transform therapeutics and preventive medicine. Harry Yang of Qisda, reflected his perspective as a tech expert saying that AI, robotics, and blockchain technologies would bring out significant changes in healthcare applications.
All speakers agreed that advancing healthcare systems with technologies is largely possible only when professionals from diverse fields join forces and participate in interdisciplinary communication. However, it’s easier said than done. Sei said, “Each field has its own language. You need to speak differently within IT professionals and clinicians.” Merizalde shared Teva’s experience in collaborating with IBM Watson to perform analytics and monitor asthma patients, “Each party has something to bring to the table in terms of solving a problem, but everyone has different approaches and paces”. The biggest challenge is when tech collaborators do not understand the slow regulatory pace with which a pharmaceutical company operates. Reitmaier added that Merck encountered conflicts while working with the diagnostic companies because of the highly regulated nature of both pharmaceutical and diagnostic industries. In order to narrow this communication gap, NVIDIA used the online platform to educate and integrate people working in different positions. Harry Yang of Qisda mentioned that the challenge of cooperating with hospitals depends on the physicians’ human resource management; Chiu from NVIDIA said that all the medical devices in the future will use artificial intelligence. Therefore, the hospitals are the good business opportunities for the ICT industry.Criteria for ideal partners When the discussion was steered to prospective collaborators, Sei said that they are looking for partners with a broad range of knowledge and collaborative mindset. Reitmaier also expressed that they are open to partners from anywhere in the world. Merizalde noted that Teva is a multinational company with a comprehensive system and complex administration. He advised businesses to be patient when working with such large companies. Chiu speaking from the standpoint of AI computing company said that a compatible partner needs to have sufficient data, be amenable to technology and willing to collaborate.
Tips to stay innovative The next question posed to the guests was regarding the steps their companies take to stay innovative. Sei answered, “In Hitachi, we focus on advancing technology while striving to translate technology into practical tools” Reitmaier stressed that diversity is the key to constantly stay innovative. “Merck keeps an open eye internally, but externally keeps scouting to outer world” she added. Merizalde from Teva, an Israel-based company, had a different take on the subject as he emphasized the importance of finding strength from within. “We feed ourselves with the innovation coming from our own country, and leverage internal innovation to an international level” he said. Chiu from NVIDIA, believed that innovation comes from integrating new technology into the current system and the healthcare startups have immense potential to make a significant impact. She also encouraged researchers to connect with international talents and learn from one another. Yang from Qisda suggested that organizations in Taiwan should work together in order to gain the expertise of operating on an international scale.
A collaborative future for all sectors 
In conclusion, the take-home message was that AI and information technology will be the next revolution in healthcare, and it has already started changing the current paradigm. In addition, key international players are excited about the development in the Asia-Pacific region. Although the goal of transforming medicine is riddled with many challenges, the panelists of the CEO forum clearly reiterated that collaboration and innovation is the way forward to overcome such difficulties.
Observations of Medical Healthcare's Ecosystem: How to implement AI technology to improve Medical efficiency
Technology possesses the power to transform any industry. In recent years, popular technologies such as AI, IoT, and blockchain have had a great impact on the medical industry. Ted Chang, CTO of Quanta Computer, moderated the discussion session where panelists mulled over the aforementioned theme. He is of the opinion that technology is just a platform. The challenge lies in exploiting that tool to make medical treatments more advanced and customized. To discuss it in detail, he invited the following representatives from the scientific and technological communities to brainstorm together: Keren Priyadarshini, Regional Business Leader at Microsoft, Vitaly Herasevich, MD, Associate Professor at the Division of Critical Care at Mayo Clinic, USA, and David Hansen, CEO of Australian e-Health Research Centre.All four experts agreed that Taiwan has a strong ICT industry and a sound medical system. If the two are successfully combined, it will greatly enhance the dynamism of Taiwan's smart medical development. Despite numerous challenges, Keren Priyadarshini believes that Taiwan's medical startups should not limit themselves. As long as they are on the cloud, they can break geographical boundaries and promote technology and cooperation to the rest of the world. She also said that the use of medical data is critical since data privacy and security are the foremost rights of a patient. Dr. Vitaly Herasevich pointed out the current flaws in clinical intensive care unit (ICU), and how the electronic medical record (EMR) can facilitate decision making and patient management. He said, “We need the right tool for the right task.” He also mentioned the role played by “ambient intelligence (AmI)” in processing complicated and bulk amount of data to help the clinicians make medical decisions in a timely manner. David Hansen believes that Taiwan's technology base is solid, so overcoming technical difficulties is definitely not a problem. He suggested to think in reverse, cut through the various medical systems, and refer to other countries' practices to find the most suitable smart medical development plan.
Alexandra Tinsman, Regional Head of NEM Foundation, noted that blockchain is a digital book and an economic record. About 90% of health care companies have begun using blockchain technology. It provides a more streamlined and secure method of maintaining transaction billing than traditional repositories. NEM's blockchain platform is a

Medical data doubles every 73 days, far more than humans could digest, so artificial intelligence (AI) is much needed. Dr. Liang-Yeu Lenny Chen, Manager & Asian Pacific Leader, IBM Watson Health, USA, said the AI developed by the company is dedicated to integrating all kinds of data, including literature, images, genetic sequencing etc., to comprehend the meaning behind it. The goal of this AI system is not to replace doctors but serve as their reliable clinical assistant.Since the successful decoding of the human genome and the reduction in the cost of gene sequencing, medical efficiency has greatly improved. However, genomics is as deep as the sea, and there is still valuable information to be explored. Dr. Alireza Haghighi, President of Advancement Initiative for Medicine and Science, Harvard Medical School, shared about the School's fundraising program that helped establish a platform to share patient genetic map data. Such data helps scientists find disease-causing genes more efficiently and benefit more patients.In the area of cancer treatment, Dr. Colin Collins, the director of Laboratory for Advanced Genome Analysis, Vancouver Prostate Centre, Canada, said humorously:
The well-known genetic editing technology CRISPR can modify and edit specific genes. However, this groundbreaking technology is more than that. Mammoth BioSciences CEO, Trevor Martin explained his company’s focus on the applications of CRISPR-Cas12 and CRISPR-Cas13, and how it could be used as a genetic search engine like Google. This innovative system is employed to quickly find target sequence segments and then applied to medical testing and diagnosis, significantly reducing the time and capital costs of researchers. Chris Shu, an investment expert at Pacific 8 Ventures, sought Trevor’s take on the controversial application of CRISPR in the birth of a baby in China that lead to a global outcry. Trevor said that he believes that the core value of any company is full communication and transparency. These two points are more important for issues that are relevant to human beings. Gene editing technology has brought about significant breakthroughs that impact human life. In terms of application, technology should not be carried out surreptitiously by scientists. He insisted that it should rather be open and transparent inviting more participation. This way the power of science and technology can be exerted to the maximum benefit of our society
MEDTEX Summit Asia Foresee the Next Wave of Healthcare Revolution. Date:2019.12.05-12.06 Venue:Taipei Nangang Exhibition Center, Hall2, 4F